Daily Candlestick Patterns

In technical analysis, traders use candlestick patterns, which are a combination of one or more candlesticks over short time periods to help determine which way the underlying asset will move. Within this page you will find daily updates of these patterns alongside detailed candlestick tutorials to help you make more money and better understand stock charting.

Bullish Engulfing Candlestick Pattern

Bullish-Engulfing-Example

What is a Bullish Engulfing Pattern?

The bullish engulfing candlestick pattern is a two-bar candlestick pattern. In this pattern, the first bar is a modest down day and in the next day a larger up day follows. This suggests that at the start of the session sellers sold the stock off, and then buyers came in and bought it all the way back up again and then some.

Bearish Engulfing Candlestick Pattern

Bearish-Engulfing-Example

What is a Bearish Engulfing Pattern?

The bearish engulfing candlestick pattern is a two-bar candlestick pattern. In this pattern, the first bar is a modest up day and in the next day a larger down day follows. This suggests that at the start of the session buyers bid the stock up, and then sellers came in and sold it all the way back down again and then some.

December 10, 2015

Bearish Engulfing Patterns December 9 2015

December 5, 2015

December 2, 2015

Bearish Engulfing Candlestick Patterns December 1st 2015

Piercing Line Patterns

Piercing-Line-Patterns-Example

What is a Piercing Line Pattern?

The piercing line pattern is a two-bar candlestick pattern.The first day is a down day and on the second day the price gaps down to the lowest low that the stock price traded the day before. The price then rises throughout the second day and closes above the midpoint of the first day. This suggests that after a long downtrend, buyers have decided to come into the stock.

Dark Cloud Cover Patterns

Dark-Cloud-Cover-Example

What is a Dark Cloud Cover Pattern?

The dark cloud cover pattern is a two-bar candlestick pattern found at the end of an uptrend. In this pattern, the first day is an up day and on the second day the price gaps up to the highest high that the stock price traded at on the previous day. The price then falls throughout the second day and closes below the midpoint of the first day. This suggests that after a long uptrend, sellers have decided to liquidate their positions in the stock.

Morning Star Patterns

Morning-Star-Pattern-Example

What is a Morning Star Pattern?

The morning star pattern is a bullish 3-bar candlestick pattern, the first candle is a large red candle defining a downtrend followed by another smaller candle closing below the lows, then a nice day up closing near the center of the first candle.

Evening Star Patterns

Evening-Star-Example

What is a Bearish Engulfing Pattern?

A bearish engulfing pattern is a candle pattern established at the end of an uptrend. Pictured above the pattern is created by interpreting the data of two completed candles. The first candle will depict the end of the established trend strength.

Bullish Harami Patterns

Bullish-Harami-Example

What is a Bullish Harami Pattern?

The bullish harami is a 3–bar candlestick pattern found at the end of a downtrend. A large candle is followed by a smaller candle whose body is within the vertical range of the larger body. The bullish harami is downtrend of negative-colored candlesticks engulfing a small positive candlestick, giving a sign of a reversal of the downward trend.

Bearish Harami Patterns

Bearish-Harami-Pattern-Example

What is a Bearish Harami Pattern?

The bearish harami is a 3–bar candlestick pattern found at the end of a downtrend. a large candlestick followed by a much smaller candlestick with a that body is located within the vertical range of the larger candle's body. Such a pattern is an indication that the previous upward trend is coming to an end.

Three White Soldiers Patterns

Three-White-Soldier-Pattern-Example

What is a Three Whit Soldiers Pattern?

The three white soldiers pattern is a 3-bar candlestick pattern found at the end of a downtrend. After an extended decline where prices have been moving steadily downwards, three large up days are known as the three white soldiers pattern. It is a strong sign of reversal – the three white soldiers are starting a new march in an upwards direction.

Three Black Crows Patterns

Three-Black-Crow-Pattern-Example

What is a Three Black Crow Pattern?

The three black crows pattern is a 3-bar candlestick pattern found at the end of a uptrend. After an extended incline where prices have been moving steadily upwards, three large down days are known as the three white soldiers pattern. It is a strong sign of reversal – as the three black crows begin to spiral share prices down.

Hammer Patterns

Hammer-Example

What is a Hammer Pattern?

The Hammer is a bullish reversal pattern that forms after a decline. In addition to a potential trend reversal, hammers can mark bottoms or support levels. The low of the long lower shadow implies that sellers drove prices lower during the session. However, the strong finish indicates that buyers regained their footing to end the session on a strong note.

Shooting Star Patterns

Shooting-Star-Example

What is a Shooting Star?

The shooting star pattern is a 1-bar candlestick pattern found at the end of an uptrend. In this pattern, the stock gaps up at the open and then rises up to a point well above where it started the day at. In general this pattern indicates that there is supply of the stock at this level and that the preceding rally is not sustainable.

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